Archive for May 27th, 2015|Daily archive page

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace. – The Washington Post

On the other hand, companies could simply join another trend — allowing employees to work from home. That model has proven to boost productivity, with employees working more hours and taking fewer breaks. On top of that, there are fewer interruptions when employees work remotely. At home, my greatest distraction is the refrigerator.  ​

via Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace. – The Washington Post.

Can Mozilla Halt Firefox’s Slide and Break Up the Mobile Internet Duopoly? | MIT Technology Review

via Can Mozilla Halt Firefox’s Slide and Break Up the Mobile Internet Duopoly? | MIT Technology Review.

I think the answer is no. They have made it difficult to get productivity apps included and seemed to have been too late for the mobile party. Conceivably, things could change, and developers could start to see Mozilla, including its mobile Firefox OS, as something other than an also ran. But I think they will have to abandon the Mozilla arrogance first, and impress upon the world that it offers something more than a nearly useless cheap device or niche browser gilded with community foil.

WHA 68: Experts Discuss Delinking R&D Costs From Pricing To Make Medicines Affordable

From the article:

The problem of drug prices eating up national health budgets has been coming up at the annual World Health Assembly. Last week, a panel of experts discussed the merits of lowering those prices by delinking research and development costs from pricing.

….

It would be best if the government does the studies so they will be taken most seriously. Their prediction is that a comparison will show delinkage is a better approach.

Several vectors moving here and they share the principle that a private-sector monopoly (or equivalent) is the problem, not the solution and that if the society made up of the individuals using the medications is to survive as a society (and not simply as a thick clot of mall rats) then rational approaches are required, so as to determine the right paths to take (and also to un-take).

WHA 68: Experts Discuss Delinking R&D Costs From Pricing To Make Medicines Affordable.

Elsevier’s new sharing policy harmful to authors and access to scholarly research » infojustice

From the letter signed by Creative Commons and 22 other organisations to Elsevier, which evidently seeks to own the practice of knowledge:

Elsevier’s new policy, announced 30 April 2015, is detrimental to article authors as well as those seeking access to these research papers. The policy imposes an embargo of at least 12 months before authors can self-archive their final manuscripts in an institutional repository–with the option of these embargoes being as long as 48 months. Beforehand, Elsevier allowed immediate deposit of the articles in repositories. The new policy also restricts access once the embargo expires by requiring that articles be shared under the most restrictive Creative Commons license–CC BY-NC-ND–which prohibits commercial use and the creation of derivative works.

Quote, from same article in Infojustice:

The letter is available here. It has been signed by the following groups, and you can add your organization to as well.

via Elsevier’s new sharing policy harmful to authors and access to scholarly research » infojustice.