Archive for June, 2011|Monthly archive page

Joi Ito: How to Save the Internet from its Success | Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon

Joi Ito: How to Save the Internet from its Success | Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon.

 

Am in China, for COPU, but had the pleasure of listening to this rather good interview of Ito.

US police smash camera for recording killing – Features – Al Jazeera English

US police smash camera for recording killing – Features – Al Jazeera English.

 

For every operation of authority, I am sure an argument can be erected to justify it. So we deal in economics, and look not simply to the immediate cause and effect but to the economics of the longterm: what anglophonic jurisprudence established. Precedence weighs down the present but even more the future.  And then we must keep in mind, to make it actually make sense, whether the reasonable man–not really society, but rather a tortable embodiment–would be affected, and if so, how badly.

Corporal punishment: Mothers self-recorded audio gives unique real-time view of spanking

Corporal punishment: Mothers self-recorded audio gives unique real-time view of spanking.

 

This is an extraordinary study.

NY Velocity – New York bike racing culture, news and events

I should add NY Velocity to my blogroll… by far the wittiest account of the subject and especially of the Lance. I think without question The Lance was a prodigy. 

Open Cures: A Protocol Outline for Mitochondrial Protofection

Open Cures: A Protocol Outline for Mitochondrial Protofection.

 

The model advocated for open (source) development is predicated for the authors and biologists on the software industry. Good! But at the same time, as a historian, I cannot help but recall prior instances where peer production and collaboration have occurred. But the difference is this: never before has so much of our culture (“our”) been “owned” or faceted by the claims of property. It’s as if the Lockean promise of America (land of no property, just land) has evaporated, leaving only the claims to what was and is and will be there. (Thus goeth the future, too: it’s been commodified into the present banality of expectation.)

What is left, of course–for there is no and never has been a land without property (remember not the Alamo but the Indians? They were here, in America, even before the Europeans named them so wrongly and then killed them disease, slavery, war.)–what is left is the need to consider property as the domain of collaboration, not a patent for exclusion, with the thing available only as a bracketed commodity on the market, to those who can afford it.

Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism

Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism.

 

Does anyone recall Gissing’s New Grubb Street? The book ends with the successful writer embarking upon the new commuter magazine, Chit-Chat, and abandoning the long slough work of novel writing and real thought. Chit chat opposes thought because it surfs (surfaces?) the top of the head and ignores the plumb of heart. Goes without saying that Gissing found this offensive, and equally, that he found it inevitable, and equally that he probably would have wanted it to be he winning, for none of the authors depicted in this risibly bleak Naturalist account is particularly rewarding or otherwise worth copying, and none is even as sexy or powerful as London’s Martin Eden, which takes a different–American?–Naturalist take.

Do I see Twitter as chit chat? It *is* the vehicle of fast talk and it can encourage the semblance of conversation, and conversation–fast–is fun. But tweeting is not real dialogue, just as we can always discern when someone talks to his phone vs his friend face to face. It’s speech snippified. Okay, no problem there. But it is also not particularly revolutionary, just as SMS wasn’t–and has effectively, already, disappeared.

People will always find fast if not better (wrong evaluative) ways of communicating or seeming to communicate. “Satisfactory” comes to mind rather than “better.”

What do I like doing? I like being at parties or seminars or classes or meetings and holding multiple conversations simultaneously, especially if they are wildly disparate topics; I like being more than one person at any time, I suppose, where “person” is the spun, woven thread of a single conversation. I like losing myself in talk.

I think a lot of people are like this. Twitter seeks to provide the means by which one can effectuate that. But it doesn’t really. I can see something like that one day doing it perfectly, but in the meantime, one has to wonder: what’s wrong with just having a party, symposium, class, seminar, meeting, conference–with seeing people. And talking.